All About Crochet Hook Sizes

When you’re new to crochet, crochet hook sizes can leave you a wee bit flummoxed. If like me, you watch a lot of crocheters on YouTube and you aren’t from the US, you might be wondering why you can’t find a size H or M hook in your local shops.

Don’t worry; I’ve got you covered on all your burning crochet hook size related questions. And, there’s even a nifty printable PDF crochet hook size conversion chart.

Does It Matter What Crochet Hook You Use?

Yes, and no.

Yes

If you’re following a pattern and want your project to come out the same, then it’s best to use the hook specified.

No

If you’re freestyling a project and like the stitch size and look, go with that—I often do this for berets and my take on the Scottish traditional women’s ToS (Tam o Shanter).

But, when you’re using a pattern, and your gauge* isn’t matching the pattern, change your hook size until it does.

*Gauge is a 10cm by 10cm swatch of stitches specified in a pattern that you produce before working the actual piece. Look at it as a form of practice to help you tune into the correct tension so that your finished project is as close to that of the designer’s.

What Happens If You Use A Larger Hook?

Your stitches become larger, looser, and not as defined. The resulting item would be larger than if you’d used the smaller hook specified in the pattern.

Does Using A Larger Hook Use Less Yarn?

Yes, it does. And it can be a real project saver if you know you don’t have enough of a specific yarn in your stash.

What Do Letters On Crochet Hooks Mean?

These letters are the American sizes. Other parts of the world use mm (like Australia, New Zealand, the countries of the UK and the EU), and Canada uses the imperial numbering. At one point, the UK used the imperial system, but that hasn’t been the case for donkey’s years.

Printable Crochet Hook Size Conversion Chart (PDF)

One Reply to “All About Crochet Hook Sizes”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s